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               FROM THIS PUBLICAN'S PERCH
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BY CHRIS POH, PUBLISHER OF AMERICAN PUBLIC HOUSE REVIEW


Colonial Flag as seen in f American Public House Review
Chris Poh as seen in American Public House ReviewEvery year at about this time I spend a few late night hours trying to wrap my intellect and soul around the American Revolution. This year’s patriotic passage was enhanced with excerpts from Joseph Ellis’s Founding Brothers, the exceptional account of the lives and relationships of those that promoted and propagated the American cause.

As one dissects the personalities of our forefathers one quickly discovers that they could be as trying and treacherous as the current strain of political sages, perhaps even more so. Ellis brings to light conditions of intrigue, scandal and libelous behavior, a world where members of congress enlist military officers to subvert civil authority, a world where cabinet members plot against the president, and even a much venerated commander in chief is accused of high treason.

Being aware of their own failings and frailties, the founding fathers advocated for a healthy distrust of government. John Adams not only had strong misgivings about the governing class, he was also extremely wary of the need for a large standing army. He preferred instead to defend the new nation with a strong naval force, which he referred to as “America’s wooden walls.

The staff of American Public House Review also prefers wooden walls; but instead of frigates and corsairs, we choose to ply our independence in old pubs and historic barrooms. During the month of July we invite our readers to enjoy our revolutionary past by visiting the “COLONIAL TAVERNS” section of our magazine. And while you’re at it, why not give another listen to what I believe to be the best damn song of revolution ever written - Dick Gaughan’s “Tom Paine’s Bones.”

Even though our country is facing another bout of “The times that try men’s souls…,” we can take comfort knowing that we continue to flourish as a nation, bound by common cause and ruled by uncommon, unconventional and occasionally unruly individuals.







AMERICAN PUBLIC HOUSE REVIEW text, images, and music © 2007-2009. All rights reserved. 
All content is subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. Email: ed.petersen@americanpublichousereview.com for permission before use.

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