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    HOW DO YOU MAKE A RUM RUNNER
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BY CHRIS POH


REVENGE ON A RUM RUNNER


"These men were bringing in liquor for New Year's Eve. They knew it would be consumed by Governors, Mayors, Selectmen, and Judges of the Supreme Court—in fact by public officials everywhere."

                                                                        - Former Boston Mayor John Francis “Honey Fitz” Fitzgerald.



"The Coast Guard's job cannot be handled with soft words and amiable gestures. . . .” 
                                                           
                                                                        - Rear-Admiral Frederick C. Billard, Commandant of the Coast Guard

                                                                                                                        commenting about the attack on the Black Duck


Photo courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard archives      
a crum runner crippled by the Coast Guard as seen in the American Public House Review
A RUM RUNNER CRIPPLED BY THE U.S. COAST GUARD


Even though New England was already in the midst of a terrible drought, the evening of December 31, 1929 would prove to be much dryer than anticipated. Not only had the powers from above deprived the area of life giving waters; but now the powers from below in Washington DC would further diminish the supply of “The Water of Life.” Two nights earlier Boatswain Alexander C. Cornell of the United States Coast Guard Boat 290 opened fire on the crew of the rum-running boat Black Duck. For nearly a year the “Duck” prevailed in a perilous game of cat-and-mouse in the waters of Narragansett Bay. But in this round of play her twin Liberty engines would not be enough to escape the burst of machine gun fire that sliced through the wheelhouse, wounding her captain, Charles Travers, and killing crew members Jacob Weisman, Johnny Goulart and Dudley Brandt.

From Pawtucket to Portland, New Englanders cried foul as they bemoaned the loss of 3 precious American lives and the loss of 383 cases of preferred Canadian whiskey. From the government’s perspective the whole affair was justified. The unfortunate casualties were simply the result of the Black Duck mistakenly turning into the line of warning fire while trying to elude capture. Captain Travers contested that account of the story until the day he died. And a review of the Coast Guard records, which appeared in an article in Yankee Magazine in December of 1999, seems to support his assertions. There is a distinct possibility that the overly zealous Boatswain Cornel had a personal grudge against Travers and his crew. “Duck hunting” was not a sport that Cornel was particularly good at, and during a previous encounter in which he was actually able to briefly detain his quarry, the subsequent search of the boat yielded nothing. Later the frustrated boatswain was overheard warning Captain Travers that a future meeting might include a bit of gunplay.

In honor of those colorful characters that ran the rum, and other choice potables, from 1920 – 1933 we proudly share the following recipe:


Rum Runner as seen in American Public House Review







The Rum Runner Cocktail 
    
     Ingredients:
·    1 oz pineapple juice
·    1 oz orange juice
·    1 oz blackberry liqueur
·    1 oz banana liqueur
·    1 oz light rum
·    1 oz dark rum or aged rum
·    Splash grenadine
·    Optional: one ounce of Bacardi 151 to float on top
·    Orange slice (optional)

Shake over ice and serve in a tall glass







AMERICAN PUBLIC HOUSE REVIEW text, images, and music © All rights reserved.
All content is subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. Email: ed.petersen@americanpublichousereview.com for permission before use.

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