HOME
BLOG
BACKBAR
JUKEBOX
PUBLICAN'S PERCH
AD INFO
ABOUT US
CONTACT US
NEWSLETTER


 

   How Do You Make a Manhattan
gray logo

BY CHRIS POH


 I'll Take Manhattan


The Manhattan as seen in American Public House Review


     As one widespread recounting of the 1874 tale goes, Lady Randolph Churchill was hosting a party for then New York Governor and future presidential candidate Samuel J. Tilden at the Manhattan Club when the cocktail so named for its house of origin came into being. Supposedly, one Dr. Lain Marshall, an attendee at the gala event, suggested the mix of Italian vermouth, American whiskey and a dash of Angostura bitters. The drink quickly caught on, and was simply referred to by the patrons of the bars and clubs throughout the city’s neighborhoods as the Manhattan.

     There are number of reasons why this story is probably not accurate. For one, there are written references to a similar cocktail by the same name having its origins in the 1860s at another downtown drinking establishment. Furthermore, the records indicate that Lady Churchill was in France and with child, carrying England’s future Prime Minister, at the time of the alleged party for the New York governor. But last, and most importantly, Samuel J. Tilden was known to be a “Bourbon Democrat,” and the traditional Manhattan most certainly demands a good rye whiskey.

     Wherever the truth of its beginnings may lie, we do know that the Manhattan was the first cocktail to use sweet vermouth as a modifier. And that particular ingredient, along with the maraschino cherry garnish, probably led to its popularity with the ladies and inquisitive young lads. To the best of my recollection, my very first taste of alcohol was an under the table stealthy sip of that crimson concoction. With the recent emergence of America’s small craft distilleries, some of which that are producing outstanding rye whiskies, the Manhattan is once again finding favor with a new generation of “legal age” imbibers.

Here is the traditional Manhattan recipe:

·    ¾ oz of sweet vermouth
·    2 ½ oz of rye whiskey
·    Dash of Angostura bitters
·    Maraschino cherry (garnish)

Stirred (not shaken) over ice, strained into a chilled glass, garnished, and served straight up.






Previous How Do You Make a  .  .  .  Cocktails

Bull Shot cocktail as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A  .  .  .
BULLSHOT
Cosmopolitan as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A .  .  .
COSMOPOLITAN
Highball as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A  .  .  . HIGHBALL
Twin Irish Coffees as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE AN . . .
IRISH COFFEE
Jack Rose Coacktail as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO MAKE A .  .  .

JACK ROSE

Mint Julep as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A  .  .  . MINT JULEP
OLD FASHIONED AS SEEN IN AMERICAN PUBLIC HOUSE REVIEW

HOW DO YOU MAKE AN .  .  .
OLD FASHIONED
Flip cocktail as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A .  .  .
FLIP

Planters Punch cocktail as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A .  .  .
PLANTERS PUNCH

Rum RunnerCocktail as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A .  .  .
RUM RUNNER COCKTAIL
Hot Toddy as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A .  .  .
HOT TODDY
The Manhattan as seen in American Public House Review

HOW DO YOU MAKE A .  .  .
MANHATTAN






Best Bars cover

" Everything important that has ever happened in New York began
or ended in the city's BEST BARS! "


The History and Stories of the

BEST BARS

of New York

Written by  Jef Klein
Photographs by  Cary Hazelgrove


available through
TURNER PUBLISHING

www.turnerpublishing.com




AMERICAN PUBLIC HOUSE REVIEW text, images, and music © All rights reserved.
All content is subject to U.S. and international copyright laws. Email: ed.petersen@americanpublichousereview.com for permission before use.

HOME
BLOG
BACKBAR
JUKEBOX
PUBLICAN'S PERCH
AD INFO
ABOUT US
CONTACT US
NEWSLETTER