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Community Craft    


  Story by Chris Poh


Photograph by Chris Poh    
The bar at Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, Pa as seen in American Public House Review
The bar at Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, Pennsylvania



There is some evidence to suggest that there were a number of potential settlers to the New World aboard the Mayflower that were having second thoughts about putting down roots on the rocky soils of New England. But those reluctant Pilgrims were forced ashore by seamen who feared that there would not be enough beer onboard for the return voyage to London. As to the validity of that claim, history has left us little supporting documentation, but it is an undeniable fact that beer played its role in the foundation of this country. Even before erecting houses of worship, British colonists went about the task of brewing beer and establishing taverns. In 1609, eleven years before the landing at Plymouth, an ad appeared in an English newspaper seeking experienced brewers willing to bring their craft to the Virginia Colony.

In less than one hundred years after declaring her independence, America would have more than four thousand operating breweries. This was mostly the result of German immigrants that had introduced their style of lightly hopped all-malt lagers to the American palate. A public that was accustomed long hours and arduous physical labor whole heartily embraced a lighter brew. In 1810 the per capita yearly consumption of commercially produced beer was less than 1 gallon. By 1914 that number would rise to 20 gallons per person. But then came the Volstead Act and that dark day in January of 1920 when prohibition would be constitutionally recognized as the law of the land. Those who engaged in fermentation and distillation would move their trade into the shadows. And the outcome of these underground activities would more often than not yield a much inferior product.


Photograph by Chris Poh    
Brewing room at Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House Review
Brewing Room



After the repeal of the 18th amendment in 1933, the smaller family and independent breweries would be subject to a much more aggressive business climate. Over the next several decades, the large corporate producers would come to dominate the vast majority of the marketplace. And by the 1980s there were only about 50 independent operations left. The mass marketing of the big brands, while effective, did little to promote a local connection to their product. But the emergence and rapid growth of America’s craft brewing industry has gone to great lengths to forever change how we identify with that can, bottle, or glass that contains the essence of the brewer’s handiwork.

  Photograph by Chris Poh     
Doylestown, Pennsylvania as seen in American Public House Review
Doylestown,Pennsylvania


Today we are drinking more beer than ever, while I recently calculated my own level of intake to be approximately 102.6 gallons a year, the current national per capita consumption rate is about 21.5 gallons a year. That demand is now being met by the nearly 3,500 breweries that are presently in operation in the United States, with almost 99% of those businesses consisting of microbrews, brewpubs, and regional craft brewers. Doylestown Brewing Company, established in 2010, has now extended its close relationship with its customers with the opening of a brewpub in the center of the charming and historic Bucks County, Pennsylvania town that shares its name.

Doylestown, simply put, is one of the best looking towns in America. Its architecture presents a splendid mix of eighteenth and nineteenth century houses and buildings. Its streets and alleyways are lined with small shops, boutiques, eateries, and pubs. But even though many consider Doylestown home, there is a somewhat transient nature to the place, probably fueled by the fact that it is a typical county seat whose main focus is providing legal, social, and government services to the whole of a much larger area.



Photographs by Chris Poh     
Entrance to Main Street Market Place, home of Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House ReviewDoylestown Brewing Company sign as seen in American Public House Review


Photograph by Chris Poh      Old picture of the building which houses the Main Street Market Place and the Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House Review
Old picture of the building which houses the Main Street Market Place.


Photograph by Chris Poh    
Upstairs food court at Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House Review
Upstairs food court above Doylestown Brewing Company. Bring your beer up if you want. Fare from the food court is also available in the brew pub.



With that fact in mind, Joe Modestine, the owner and president of Doylestown Brewing Company, set out not only to open a brewpub, but to establish close-knit ties with the town’s residents and other businesses. Whenever possible, the construction was carried out by local contractors, and the materials and décor in the pub were provided by area artists and artisans. But Doylestown Brewing takes their commitment to the community one very unusual step further. Other neighboring businesses will be able to partner with Joe and the Head Brewer, Justin Low in order to create their own unique recipes. The finished product will be available at the brewpub as well as at other in-town outlets.        


Photograph by Jen Estes    
Stirring the wort at Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House ReviewWhat it's all about at the Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House Review


While most brewpubs and breweries are willing to provide the customary tour and tasting, very few are willing to let you play with the equipment. But in this instance both the owner and the brewer are extremely generous with their time and extensive knowledge of the craft. Joe is now the third generation of the Modestine family that has worked in the beer and hospitality industry. And Justin Low, in addition to having been formally trained at the accredited Brewing Science and Engineering Program at UC Davis, also spent 2 years working for Dock Street Brewing in Philadelphia. Justin’s brewing philosophy is simply this: Apply an equal amount of creativity, care and consistency to all styles of beer. So whether you choose to drink their signature R5 Lager, Carrie Nation Kolsch, Patriot Pale Ale, or one of their current guest brews (the Bike Works Boneshaker Bourbon Porter or the Rutherford’s Picture Perfect Belgium) a visit to Doylestown Brewing will most definitely expand and enhance your appreciation of beer. And while there are those that may dismiss the popular notion that it takes a village to raise a child—it definitely can be said that in Doylestown it takes a community to raise a good pint!


Photograph by Jen Estes    
The Crew at Doylestown Brewing in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House Review
The brew crew and the staff of Dolyestown Bike Works. Left to Right: Justin Low(Head Brewer), Brian Boger(Bikeworks), Dan Turner (Bikeworks), Mel Periard(Assistant Brewer), Joe Modestine(Owner).


Photograph by Chris Poh   
Taps at The Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House Review


Photograph by Chris Poh     
Three bottles at The Doylestown Brewing Company in Doylestown, PA as seen in American Public House Review







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