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     A LIBATION IN LAMBERTVILLE small brown logo
STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS POH

Lambertville Station in Lambertville, NJ as seen in American Public House Review
LAMBERTVILLE STATION IN LAMBERTVILLE, NEW JERSEY

Lambertville would be a delightful stop along life’s path no matter where it was located. The fact that it sits on the east bank of the Delaware River directly across from New Hope, Pennsylvania lends much to the journey. Both communities abound in 18th and 19th century history, lore and architecture.

On an unusually mild August afternoon, I break with my standard modus operandi and abandon the comfortable confines of the inside pub at the Lambertville Station and take my libations at their outside bar. The Canal Side Bar sits alongside a dormant stretch of track that for most of its operational life had been owned by either the Belvidere Delaware or Pennsylvania Railroad. Running parallel to these rails is a section of the D&R canal.
 
      Courtesy of Lambertville Station
Lambertville Station along side of D&R Canal as seen in American Public House Review
Lambertville Station on the banks of the D&R Canal as seenin American Public House Review
SUMMER FUN OUTSIDE AT THE CANAL SIDE BAR

ALONG THE DELAWARE AND RARITAN CANAL

The bar at The Lambertville Station ass seen in American Public House Review
THE INSIDE BAR IS CONGENIAL AND COMFORTABLE


As I sip a very agreeable amber ale from the local River Horse Brewery, I am struck by the powerful natural and man-made forces that converge at this location. THE LAMBERTVILLE STATION is a magnificent stone structure that was designed by Thomas Ustick Walter, the prominent Philadelphia architect who designed the north and south wings, and the cast-iron dome of the Capitol in Washington.

By the time the station was completed in 1867 the railroad line had already been active from Trenton to Belvidere for over a decade, and the sixty mile long Delaware and Raritan Canal had been moving people and cargo across New Jersey for some thirty three years. This well-engineered transportation system connected the coal fields of Pennsylvania to the industrial furnaces of New York. The successful harnessing of water and fire would provide links to isolated communities, grow commerce, and help to unleash the nation’s manufacturing might.

For beautiful pictures of vintage trains on the Belvidere & Delaware Railway click on the link:
http://www.steamphotos.com/gallery/3358001#212971144_shmeb


Old photo of a trainwreck in The Lambertville Station as seen in American Public House Review

Old photo of the Lambertville Station as seen in American Public House Review
19th CENTURY PHOTOGRAPH OF A TRAIN CALAMITY

AND THE LAMBERTVILLE STATION

       Courtesy of Lambertville Station
Lambertville Station as seen in American Public House Review

Today as one experiences this idyllic setting it is difficult to comprehend the calamities and hardships that befell those that moved the earth and worked the rails. On the banks where fisherman idle away an afternoon, Irish Immigrants collapsed and died, victims of the Asiatic Cholera that decimated their ranks in 1832. Scores were buried where they fell, perhaps using the same shovels that had once been the instruments of their labors.

As their parents sip Margaritas at trackside tables, small children attempt to maintain their balance on the parallel steel tightropes – in some instances achieving more success than the steaming behemoths of a bygone era that would jump the tracks when boilers exploded or driving wheels failed.


Lambertville Station stairway as seen American Public House Review

Interior at The Lambertville Station as seen in American Public House Review


As the sun begins to set over the Delaware, I raise my pint to my lips one last time. I look out over the canal and down the long stretch of rail and I find myself pining for a more romantic mode of transport home. This junction in the past has been a place of great comings and goings. And now in its present form and function it is truly a great place to stay.


Lambertville Station as seen in American Public House Review




LAMBERTVILLE STATION


11 BRIDGE STREET
LAMBERTVILLE, NEW JERSEY 08530

RESTAURANT: (609) 397-8300
INN: (609) 397-4400


www.lambertvillestation.com


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