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      MERCI BEAUCOUP BON MARQUIS 
small black and white logo
DAVID McBRIDE
Colonial American flag as seen in American Public House ReviewThe history of the American Revolution is dominated by one man, George Washington.  Unlike any other period of time, this one man captures almost the entire spotlight within our history books.  But I am certain Washington himself would humbly pass credit for this grand achievement to those many lesser known soldiers who performed unbelievable acts of military brilliance against terrific odds.  People like Daniel Morgan who routed Banastre Tarleton’s dragoons at the Battle of the Cowpens, or Henry Knox who somehow convinced men and oxen to literally drag over 50 heavy cannons from Fort Ticonderoga in New York through knee deep snow and force the British to abandon Boston.  It was these more anonymous heroes, like Nathaniel Green, Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben, and John Glover, who did the dirty work needed to defeat the world’s largest superpower.

Another of those men was a young, barely twenty year old, French aristocrat named Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette.  He was extremely wealthy and at the highest end of the nobility order in France.  He was also orphaned at the age of twelve and at fourteen he joined the military.

Lafayette soon learned of America’s Declaration of Independence and its struggle against the British Empire.  With liberty and glory in his heart, Lafayette made his way to the colonies to volunteer for the Continental Army.  Congress commissioned him a Major General and he quickly became one of, if not Washington’s closest and most beloved subordinates.  Many historians go so far as to call Lafayette the son George Washington never had.

But Lafayette did turn out to be very deserving of his rank as a Major General.  One small example took place just a few miles North West of Philadelphia, in a town now called Barren Hill, where the Marquis was ordered to collect intelligence on the British stationed in the former colonial capitol.  The British would have liked nothing better than to capture a son of their biggest and most bitter geopolitical rivals, and so they moved a superior force quickly towards Lafayette’s position.  Soon the Americans were nearly surrounded, but Lafayette was up to the task.  He pulled off the kind of escape that Washington himself became so famous for and the Americans slipped away to fight another day.  It was a master stroke of military maneuvering.  
                                 David Mc Bride 
Portait of the Marquis de Lafayette as seen in American Public House Review
  THE MARQUIS DE LAFAYETTE

  Chris Poh
 David Mc Bride    
The large bar at The General Lafayette Inn and Brewery as seen in American Public House Review
THE MAIN BAR
small bar of the General Lafayette Inn and Brewery as seen in American Public House Review
ANOTHER, MORE INTIMATE BAR

What was then called Barren Hill is now a Philadelphia suburb with the terrifically tributary name of Lafayette Hill.  But the
name change is not the only fitting salutation to this great Frenchmen who devoted himself to the American cause.  An inn that likely housed some of Lafayette’s aides and probably welcomed the Marquis himself on a few occasions also now pays tribute to the man who led America’s freedom fighters out of Barren Hill.  It is a brilliant Bed and Breakfast, and brewpub called"THE GENERAL LAFAYETTE INN AND BREWERY."

  Chris Poh  
     Chris Poh   
The main dining room of the General Lafayette Inn and Brewery as seen in American Public House Review
DRAMATIC MAIN DINING ROOM
t-shirt offered by The General Lafayette Inn and Brewery as seen in American Public House Review
GENDER POLITICS ARE THE SAME AS THEY EVER WERE


Visitors to this beautiful colonial inn are immediately taken in by its history and charm.    The low ceilings and wonderful trimmings make the visitor feel almost like they’ve stepped back in time.  The walls are filled with reminders of the Marquis de Lafayette and the even lesser known Native Americans who fought alongside him.  If you can, take some time to walk around the tavern and restaurant area so you can take in some of the collection.  For the history buff, the General Lafayette Inn is a jewel.

For the beer aficionado, the Lafayette should be on your list of must-see places.  They offer a nice selection of house brews that hits a wide range of tastes.  Brewer Russ Czajka has done some brilliant work here, and if you’re lucky you may even get a ghost story out of him.

So if you ever wanted to learn more about the American Revolution take some time and acquaint yourself with those who you may not know all that much about.  A great starting point can be found in the northern suburbs of Philadelphia where you can walk in the path of a young Frenchman who devoted his life to liberty.  The General Lafayette Inn will surely be worth the trip.

Mug in the General Lafayette Inn and Brewery as seen in American Public House Review
The General Lafyette Inn and Brewery sign as seen in American Public House Review
                      David Mc Bride

  Chris Poh
Chris Poh 
Brew and mash kettles of the General Lafayette Inn and Brewery as seen in American Public House Review
BREW AND MASH KETTLES IN THE BREWERY
Fermenters of the General Lafayette Inn and Brewery as seen in American Public House Review
         FERMENTERS

David Mc Bride
Brew board of the General Lafayette Inn as seen in American Public House Review
THE BOARD OF BREWERY OFFERINGS

Night view of the General Lafayette Inn and Brewey as seen in American Public House Review




THE GENERAL LAFAYETTE INN AND BREWERY

646 GERMANTOWN PIKE
LAFAYETTE HILL, PENNSYLVANIA 19444

(610) 941-0600

www.generallafayetteinn.com


Thanks to Sue Chastain http://graphicsoft.about.com/ for the Fleur De Lis
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