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   NEVADA'S OLDEST THIRST PARLOR SMALL WHITE LOGO
STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS POH



The genoa as seen in American Public House Review
NO IT'S NOT A MOVIE SET. IT'S THE FOR REAL GENOA BAR AND SALOON



Genoa Horse Shoe Sign as seen in American Public House Review

Just the phrase, “Nevada’s Oldest Thirst Parlor” coupled to one picture of this enduring revered landmark should be reason enough to catch the next flight to Reno and head south on route 395 through the Carson Valley toward the GENOA BAR AND SALOON.

Personally I would recommend the slower southeasterly trek over the Washoe Mountains. This approach offers stunning views of the Sierras and the chance to build up a really big thirst. And if you’re unable to keep that desire for libation at bay, I suggest a respite at one of the better licensed premises in Virginia City before completing the journey to Genoa.




The Sierra foothills as seen in American Public House Review
HIGH IN THE WASHOE MOUNTAINS WITH THE SIERRA NEVADA IN THE DISTANCE


Sunrise over the Washoe Mountains as seen in American Public House Review
SUNRISE OVER THE WASHOES



Give or take a couple of wandering souls, approximately 250 people reside in this outpost at the base of the mountains below Lake Tahoe. Settled by Mormon traders around 1850 it became known as Mormon Station; but was renamed “Genoa” in 1855 by a church elder who was assigned to the territory in order to survey the town and establish a working government. Since 1853 the building which today operates as the Genoa Bar, has provided comfort, aid and entertainment to those generations of intrepid individuals that have called this rugged and  magnificent piece of western expanse home.



Genoa Nevada circa 1890 as seen in American Public House Review
GENOA, NEVADA CIRCA 1890



Genoa patron ass seen in American Public House Review
AMBIANCE APPROPRIATE PATRON


srtatue as seen in American Public House Review
"SNOWSHOE THOMPSON"

Much of my own regard for the tavern life has been nurtured by those classic celluloid images of the western saloon. Beginning with my hitchhiking days during the 1970s I ventured across the continental divide in search of those vaunted swinging doors that would provide a time portal back to the world of cowboys and cattle barons, gun fighters and gamblers. More often than not those locations were sullied by the trappings and technologies of the modern era. THE GENOA BAR AND SALOON has been able to minimize the impact of contemporary society on its gracious old structure. This faithfulness to its original purpose and design has made it a favorite location for artists, actors and directors trying to capture the spirit and to tell the story of the American west.



Genoa bottles as seen in American Public House Review

Genoa picture as seen in American Public House Review

police badge as seen in American Public House Review
THE GENOA IS ALSO A MUSEUM OF THE OLD WEST



While much of that story has been about greed, gun play and avarice; there is that side of the saga that speaks to the better qualities of mankind. The staff and patrons of the Genoa Bar have, with few exceptions, exemplified the benevolence, generosity and supportive side of human nature. Why else would people like Mark Twain, Ulysses S. Grant, Teddy Roosevelt, Clark Gable, Clint Eastwood, John Wayne, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash and Raquel Welch choose to hang their hats at this particular thirst parlor? Well actually, truth be told, Raquel hung her bra here with the understanding that all the other fine examples of women’s undergarments that were on display be relegated to the safe. But even this bit of Genoa lore is testament to the code of conduct and fair play administered in this part of the old west.




The Genoa bar as seen in American Public House Review
THE ONLY ICONS MISSING ARE ADAM, HOSS, AND LITTLE JOE



On this New Year's Eve, as it has been for years past, the wood stove will be lit, the neon and incandescent will be extinguished, and the original oil lamps will provide illumination to friends and neighbors gathered around the bar. From the heights of the Sierras one might barely discern that faint glimmer of light from below; but from within its walls the welcoming glow of a community celebrating life at “Nevada’s Oldest Thirst Parlor” is indisputable! It provides a feeling of transportation into a different time. Original hardware and adornments are still in place preserving the history within. The warm ambiance of an earlier era hangs well throughout each corner, nook, and cranny.



The Genoa in the snow  as seen in American Public House Review
SUBLIME IN THE SNOW






THE GENOA BAR AND SALOON


2282 Main Street
Genoa, Nevada 89411
(775) 782-3870


www.genoabarandsaloon.com



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